Flash Back Friday – A Time To Belong

Using the WayBack Machine, let’s revisit one of my previously released books. Here’s a short excerpt from Book 3 of the MacNicol Clan Through Time series – A Time To Belong.

Flash Back Friday2Enjoy . . . alway

Daniel found himself on a plane sitting next to his sister and brother-in-law, questioning his choices as they headed toward the Atlantic coast on their way to Glasgow. It wasn’t as though he didn’t like to see new places. He had traveled up and down the West Coast with his dad visiting horse shows, and had been to Canada and Mexico, but this was the first time he’d be leaving the North American continent. Honestly, he found the prospect of a long transatlantic flight to be a bit unnerving. Knowing they would be spending the next few hours flying over miles of ocean before they reached land again was not in his comfort zone, he wondered how he had let his conniving little sister talk him into this adventure.

Dinner had been served, and the cabin lights were dimmed to encourage the passengers to sleep or rest quietly. Daniel figured it made the long hours of the flight a lot easier on the passengers and flight attendants, but it hardly helped to quell his anxiety. He was uncomfortably aware of his seatmates as he tried not to fidget, but hell, a body wasn’t meant to sit still in one place for so long, and it was his bad luck to have ended up with the window seat.

Robert and Teressa were already sleeping, curled up under their airline-issued blankets. Apparently, they were okay with the long overnight trip, but Daniel was finding it much harder to settle in. The journey was long, and the large plane was nearly full for the nonstop flight. He was grateful Teressa and Robert had used their frequent-flyer miles to upgrade to roomier seats, but the space was still cramped for his six-foot-three-inch frame. And instead of being a soothing white noise, the hum of the engines created an annoying vibrating buzz in his ears.

He wanted to get up and stretch his legs, but he didn’t want to disturb Teressa and Robert, so he sat and stared out the small oval window into the reflective blackness of the nighttime sky, regretting his misfortune of getting stuck with the inside seat. When they were boarding, he had agreed to let Robert take the aisle seat, always being the nice guy, and as he knew, nice guys always finished last. He glanced again at Teressa, his younger sister, happily married to the man of her dreams, and knew he was definitely finishing last. He was the last unmarried sibling and the last one still at home.

Daniel sat in the dim light cast by the overhead reading lamp, wondering what he could do to get some sleep, or at least relax enough to forget he was thirty thousand feet above endless ocean. Maybe not exactly endless ocean, but close enough.

He searched the seat back pocket in front of him and flipped through the airline’s in-flight magazine. It was beyond boring and of no use for his insomnia. Looking over at the seat back pocket in front of Teressa, he noticed her travel journal poking halfway out. She’d been writing in it earlier. When he had asked her about the journal, she had explained she had started the travel journal during her first trip to the Isle of Skye. With each succeeding trip, she planned to add to the journal, creating a memoir of her travels to Scotland.

Daniel didn’t usually go snooping into his sister’s personal stuff, but since she hadn’t seemed particularly secretive when she had told him about her journal, he figured she wouldn’t mind. Hopefully, it would tell him about the places they planned to visit, and perhaps provide a little insight into his sister’s opinions on their intended destination. With hardly a second thought, he reached for his sister’s journal, flipped it open, and started reading.

A few hours later, and several disbelieving glances at the two people sleeping next to him, he wasn’t sure if he had read a credible account of an incredible journey, or if his sister was a fantastic storyteller. . . . . He didn’t know what to think of his sister’s story except that it was simply unbelievable. Interesting, but unbelievable. He’d give her credit on one count: she and Robert seemed made for each other. Whether it was because they were soulmates across time or just lucky in love, he couldn’t say, but they certainly seemed to belong together.

With a final shake of his head, Daniel tucked Teressa’s journal back into the seat pocket in front of her and switched off his overhead light. It was time to close his eyes and rest even if he couldn’t sleep. As he reached to close the shade of the little oval window next to him, he paused a moment and gazed out into the early morning sky.

The glow of the rising sun rushing to meet the eastward-flying plane was just beginning to leak above the horizon. A lone star still shone bright in his limited view of the vast endless sky. It occurred to him that this single star, shining alone in the vastness of space, had spent eons shining its light out into the cosmos, always existing exactly where it was meant to be. In a moment of honest confession, he softly whispered, “I wish I knew where I belong.”

He dropped the shade, closed his eyes, and laid his head back to relax. A soft breeze danced across his forehead. Just before he unexpectedly fell into a deep and peaceful sleep, he heard a woman’s voice softly whisper, “A wish expressed, a favor bestowed.”

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000038_00064]

 

Flash Back Friday – A Time To Begin

Using the WayBack Machine, let’s revisit one of my previously released books. Here’s a short excerpt from Book 1 of the MacNicol Clan Through Time series – A Time To Begin.

Flash Back FridayEnjoy . . . always.

Sophie liked nothing better than a good story, especially ones with happy endings, but enough was enough. . . . Adam loved to capture everyone’s attention with tales of his earthly adventures, but Sophie was tired of his never-ending boasting.

Pooh on Adam and his stupid, boring stories. So what if he had ventured out into the earthly realm and mingled with humans? Why should she or the rest of the fae kingdom care? Pooh on her sister Danu, the queen of the fae, for being so delightfully entertained by his ramblings. Even pooh on her sister Sindi for laughing at his tales and encouraging him to tell more. But mostly, pooh on her for not having her own stories to tell. Nothing exciting ever happened to her.

It was annoying to think she had lounged away another day listening to gossip and tall tales from Adam. Still, annoying as he was, Sophie was also intrigued by Adam’s stories. What was it about the earthly realm that made it so appealing? Maybe she should take a look for herself. Focusing her mind, she gazed through the veil shielding the world of the fae from that of the humans’ to see what she could find. The scene that appeared before her was a rough and rugged seashore with gentle rolling waves. Unfortunately, the splendid landscape was scarred by a lone man lying face down on the beach. Darn. It was so like a human to muddy up a perfectly good view of their earth, and yet, offensive as his presence was, she found she couldn’t look away.

The MacNicol Clan Through Time, Book 1

A Time To Begin, The MacNicol Clan Through Time, Book 1

 

S.EX. (Short Excerpt) from Dreaming In Moonlight

Lord Gavin Richard Montague, Grand Duke of Maninberg, remembered all too well his life as a mortal man. He still carried the appearance of being a young man, in the prime of his life. His thick, dark hair did not thin or turn grey and his dark brown eyes did not dim or lose their focus. His strong warrior body did not weaken or stoop with the burden of age. Over the years, the sharp hollows of his cheeks may have grown more pronounced and the timbre of his voice may have deepened, but no other signs of age befell his being.

Time had passed, but his memories never faded. He’d been young, barely thirty years of age, proudly arrogant and supremely egotistical, when his father, the Grand Duke Richard David Montague, had died defending his kingdom. Focusing only on his desire to claim his birthright and gain ultimate control over his father’s realm, Gavin had called upon the highest powers of the land to grant his wish. For better or worse, his wish had been granted, almost too willingly, by the wizard Tazire.

It seemed so simple, so amazingly simple. In exchange for accepting immortality, he had been granted complete and total control of his kingdom, the small but prosperous Duchy of Maninberg. At the time he had thought it the most magnificent blessing possible, the ultimate fulfillment of his grandest desire, to live forever with complete and total control of Maninberg. However, he quickly discovered there was one stipulation he had not fully considered. He was absolutely, positively, and completely limited to inhabiting his domain and only his domain, always and forever, and not one step more.

Years upon years, decades upon decades, had given him ample time to repeatedly test this limitation. Countless times he had tested the power holding him confined to his land, and each time he had experienced the same disappointing results. He could not step one foot outside of his domain. He could not add one square inch of ground to his kingdom, nor could any be taken from him.

His kingdom had become his cage.

Sneak-a-Peeps: Until We Meet Again

The following is an excerpt from Until We Meet Again.  I hope you enjoy. . . . always.

She needed to pull herself out of the twenty-first century and set her thoughts on 1888. If there was one thing she had learned from her years of traveling through time, it was the value of living in the moment, regardless of where or when she was. It wasn’t productive to focus on the vastness of the past, or even on the possibilities of the future. It was best to focus only on the immediacy of the moment before her.
She picked up her satchel and headed for door number three; the one assigned to her. She placed her hand on the door knob and took a deep breath. Within a matter of seconds she would travel through time. She opened the door, stepped into the antechamber, and waited for the door to click closed behind her. She took another deep breath as she counted; one-thousand-one, one-thousand-two, one-thousand-three. She opened the front facing door and stepped out onto the sidewalk in front of a secondhand bookstore. The large clock tower decorating the bank building across the street read six o’clock. She didn’t need to ask anyone to know she was standing in downtown Manhattan on Sunday evening, the tenth of June, 1888. All it took was four small steps and one giant leap of faith.